The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 08 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 478 pages of information about The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 08.

[FOR THE NEXT SECTION OF THIS GENERAL SURVEY SEE VOLUME IX]

[Footnote 1:  See Origin and Progress of Printing, page 5.]

[Footnote 2:  See Beginning and Progress of the Renaissance, vol. ix, p. 110.]

[Footnote 3:  See Rebuilding of Rome by Nicholas V, page 46.]

[Footnote 4:  See Mahomet II Takes Constantinople, page 55.]

[Footnote 5:  See John Hunyady Repulses the Turks, page 30.]

[Footnote 6:  See Ivan the Great Unites Russia, page 109.]

[Footnote 7:  See Establishment of Swiss Independence, page 336.]

[Footnote 8:  See Culmination of the Power of Burgundy, page 125.]

[Footnote 9:  See Death of Charles the Bold, page 155.]

[Footnote 10:  See Wars of the Roses, page 72.]

[Footnote 11:  See Murder of the Princes in the Tower, page 192,]

[Footnote 12:  See Conspiracy, Rebellion, and Execution of Perkin Warbeck, page 250.]

[Footnote 13:  See Conquest of Granada, page 202.]

[Footnote 14:  See Inquisition Established in Spain, page 166.]

[Footnote 15:  See Columbus Discovers America, page 224.]

[Footnote 16:  See The Sea Route to India, page 299.]

[Footnote 17:  See Discovery of the Mainland of North America by the Cabots, page 282.]

[Footnote 18:  See Columbus Discovers South America, page 323.]

[Footnote 19:  See Amerigo Vespucci in America, page 346.]

[Footnote 20:  See Balboa Discovers the Pacific, page 381.]

[Footnote 21:  See Lorenzo de’Medici Rules in Florence, page 134.]

[Footnote 22:  See Painting of the Sistine Chapel, page 369.]

[Footnote 23:  See Savonarola’s Reforms and Death, page 265.]

[Footnote 24:  See Rise and Fall of the Borgias, page 360.]

ORIGIN AND PROGRESS OF PRINTING

A.D. 1438

HENRY GEORGE BOHN

It was perhaps not altogether fortuitous that the invention of printing came concurrently with the Revival of Learning.  Men’s minds were turned toward practical experiment in that art by the very influences made active through the labors of those scholars who ushered in the Renaissance.  “The art preservative of all other arts” has also preserved the records of its own beginnings and development, although of its earlier sources our knowledge is very obscure, and even the modern achievement, which antiquity in various ways foreshadowed, is itself a subject of uncertainty and dispute.

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The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 08 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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