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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 139 pages of information about The Healing of Nations and the Hidden Sources of Their Strife.

FOOTNOTES: 

[31] My Life, vol ii, p. 288.

[32] G. Lowes Dickinson, Civilizations of India, China, and Japan, p.43.  See also Eugene Simon, La Cite Chinoise, passim.

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APPENDIX

[The following extracts, mostly from contemporaneous sources, are gathered together in an Appendix with the object of throwing side-lights, often from opposing points of view, on the questions raised in the text.]

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APPENDIX

A NEW AND BETTER PEACE.

“If we now destroy the German national idol, it must not be to set up an idol of our own in its place.  There will be ruin enough after the war to repair, and a heavy task for all the nations in repairing it; but if they have learned then that peace is not a disguised war but a state of being in which men and nations alike pursue their own ideas of excellence without rivalry, then we shall know that the irrevocable dead have not died in vain.”—­"Times” Literary Supplement, September 17, 1914.

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THE CHANGE FROM THE GERMANY OF KANT AND GOETHE AND SCHUBERT TO THE GERMANY OF TO-DAY—­AND THE DELUSION OF IMPERIALISM.

“What, then, has wrought this wonderful change in a people so closely allied to ourselves, whose race is so similar that their children in the hotels of France and Italy are mistaken for British children?  The human raw material is the same, and until half a century ago gave results which won our respect and admiration.  What is this change of the last half-century which from the same material gives results so different?  There can be only one answer.  The old Germany was a Germany of small, self-governing States, of small political power; the new Germany is a ‘great’ Germany, with a new ideal and spirit which comes of victory and military and political power, of the reshaping of political and social institutions which the retention of conquered territory demands, its militarization, regimentation, centralization, and unchallenged authority; the cultivation of the spirit of domination, the desire to justify and to frame a philosophy to buttress it.  Some one has spoken of the war which made ’Germany great and Germans small.’...”

“...So in our day, it is not the German national faith, the Deutschtum, the belief that the German national ideal is best for the German—­it is not that belief that is a danger to Europe.  It is a belief that that German national ideal is the best for all other people, and that the Germans have a right to impose it by the force of their armies.  It is that belief alone which can be destroyed by armies.  We must show that we do not intend to be brought under

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