Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 443 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Complete.
Through Antenora roamest, with such force
As were past suff’rance, wert thou living still?”
     “And I am living, to thy joy perchance,”
Was my reply, “if fame be dear to thee,
That with the rest I may thy name enrol.” 
     “The contrary of what I covet most,”
Said he, “thou tender’st:  hence; nor vex me more. 
Ill knowest thou to flatter in this vale.” 
     Then seizing on his hinder scalp, I cried: 
“Name thee, or not a hair shall tarry here.” 
     “Rend all away,” he answer’d, “yet for that
I will not tell nor show thee who I am,
Though at my head thou pluck a thousand times.” 
     Now I had grasp’d his tresses, and stript off
More than one tuft, he barking, with his eyes
Drawn in and downward, when another cried,
“What ails thee, Bocca?  Sound not loud enough
Thy chatt’ring teeth, but thou must bark outright? 
What devil wrings thee?”—­” Now,” said I, “be dumb,
Accursed traitor! to thy shame of thee
True tidings will I bear.”—­” Off,” he replied,
“Tell what thou list; but as thou escape from hence
To speak of him whose tongue hath been so glib,
Forget not:  here he wails the Frenchman’s gold. 
‘Him of Duera,’ thou canst say, ’I mark’d,
Where the starv’d sinners pine.’  If thou be ask’d
What other shade was with them, at thy side
Is Beccaria, whose red gorge distain’d
The biting axe of Florence.  Farther on,
If I misdeem not, Soldanieri bides,
With Ganellon, and Tribaldello, him
Who op’d Faenza when the people slept.” 
     We now had left him, passing on our way,
When I beheld two spirits by the ice
Pent in one hollow, that the head of one
Was cowl unto the other; and as bread
Is raven’d up through hunger, th’ uppermost
Did so apply his fangs to th’ other’s brain,
Where the spine joins it.  Not more furiously
On Menalippus’ temples Tydeus gnaw’d,
Than on that skull and on its garbage he. 
     “O thou who show’st so beastly sign of hate
’Gainst him thou prey’st on, let me hear,” said I
“The cause, on such condition, that if right
Warrant thy grievance, knowing who ye are,
And what the colour of his sinning was,
I may repay thee in the world above,
If that, wherewith I speak be moist so long.”

CANTO XXXIII

His jaws uplifting from their fell repast,
That sinner wip’d them on the hairs o’ th’ head,
Which he behind had mangled, then began: 
“Thy will obeying, I call up afresh
Sorrow past cure, which but to think of wrings
My heart, or ere I tell on’t.  But if words,
That I may utter, shall prove seed to bear
Fruit of eternal infamy to him,
The traitor whom I gnaw at, thou at once
Shalt see me speak and weep.  Who thou mayst be
I know not, nor how here below art come: 
But Florentine thou seemest of a truth,
When I do hear thee.  Know I was on earth

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Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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