Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 602 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Complete.
The banks whereby they glide to Arno’s stream,
Stand ever in my view; and not in vain;
For more the pictur’d semblance dries me up,
Much more than the disease, which makes the flesh
Desert these shrivel’d cheeks.  So from the place,
Where I transgress’d, stern justice urging me,
Takes means to quicken more my lab’ring sighs. 
There is Romena, where I falsified
The metal with the Baptist’s form imprest,
For which on earth I left my body burnt. 
But if I here might see the sorrowing soul
Of Guido, Alessandro, or their brother,
For Branda’s limpid spring I would not change
The welcome sight.  One is e’en now within,
If truly the mad spirits tell, that round
Are wand’ring.  But wherein besteads me that? 
My limbs are fetter’d.  Were I but so light,
That I each hundred years might move one inch,
I had set forth already on this path,
Seeking him out amidst the shapeless crew,
Although eleven miles it wind, not more
Than half of one across.  They brought me down
Among this tribe; induc’d by them I stamp’d
The florens with three carats of alloy.” 
     “Who are that abject pair,” I next inquir’d,
“That closely bounding thee upon thy right
Lie smoking, like a band in winter steep’d
In the chill stream?”—­“When to this gulf I dropt,”
He answer’d, “here I found them; since that hour
They have not turn’d, nor ever shall, I ween,
Till time hath run his course.  One is that dame
The false accuser of the Hebrew youth;
Sinon the other, that false Greek from Troy. 
Sharp fever drains the reeky moistness out,
In such a cloud upsteam’d.”  When that he heard,
One, gall’d perchance to be so darkly nam’d,
With clench’d hand smote him on the braced paunch,
That like a drum resounded:  but forthwith
Adamo smote him on the face, the blow
Returning with his arm, that seem’d as hard. 
     “Though my o’erweighty limbs have ta’en from me
The power to move,” said he, “I have an arm
At liberty for such employ.”  To whom
Was answer’d:  “When thou wentest to the fire,
Thou hadst it not so ready at command,
Then readier when it coin’d th’ impostor gold.” 
     And thus the dropsied:  “Ay, now speak’st thou true. 
But there thou gav’st not such true testimony,
When thou wast question’d of the truth, at Troy.” 
     “If I spake false, thou falsely stamp’dst the coin,”
Said Sinon; “I am here but for one fault,
And thou for more than any imp beside.” 
     “Remember,” he replied, “O perjur’d one,
The horse remember, that did teem with death,
And all the world be witness to thy guilt.” 
     “To thine,” return’d the Greek, “witness the thirst
Whence thy tongue cracks, witness the fluid mound,
Rear’d by thy belly up before thine eyes,
A mass corrupt.”  To whom the coiner thus: 
“Thy mouth gapes wide as ever to let pass
Its evil saying.  Me if thirst assails,
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Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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