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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 443 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Complete.
“O brothers!” I began, “who to the west
Through perils without number now have reach’d,
To this the short remaining watch, that yet
Our senses have to wake, refuse not proof
Of the unpeopled world, following the track
Of Phoebus.  Call to mind from whence we sprang: 
Ye were not form’d to live the life of brutes
But virtue to pursue and knowledge high. 
With these few words I sharpen’d for the voyage
The mind of my associates, that I then
Could scarcely have withheld them.  To the dawn
Our poop we turn’d, and for the witless flight
Made our oars wings, still gaining on the left. 
Each star of the’ other pole night now beheld,
And ours so low, that from the ocean-floor
It rose not.  Five times re-illum’d, as oft
Vanish’d the light from underneath the moon
Since the deep way we enter’d, when from far
Appear’d a mountain dim, loftiest methought
Of all I e’er beheld.  Joy seiz’d us straight,
But soon to mourning changed.  From the new land
A whirlwind sprung, and at her foremost side
Did strike the vessel.  Thrice it whirl’d her round
With all the waves, the fourth time lifted up
The poop, and sank the prow:  so fate decreed: 
And over us the booming billow clos’d.”

CANTO XXVII

Now upward rose the flame, and still’d its light
To speak no more, and now pass’d on with leave
From the mild poet gain’d, when following came
Another, from whose top a sound confus’d,
Forth issuing, drew our eyes that way to look. 
     As the Sicilian bull, that rightfully
His cries first echoed, who had shap’d its mould,
Did so rebellow, with the voice of him
Tormented, that the brazen monster seem’d
Pierc’d through with pain; thus while no way they found
Nor avenue immediate through the flame,
Into its language turn’d the dismal words: 
But soon as they had won their passage forth,
Up from the point, which vibrating obey’d
Their motion at the tongue, these sounds we heard: 
“O thou! to whom I now direct my voice! 
That lately didst exclaim in Lombard phrase,
     Depart thou, I solicit thee no more,’
Though somewhat tardy I perchance arrive
Let it not irk thee here to pause awhile,
And with me parley:  lo! it irks not me
And yet I burn.  If but e’en now thou fall
into this blind world, from that pleasant land
Of Latium, whence I draw my sum of guilt,
Tell me if those, who in Romagna dwell,
Have peace or war.  For of the mountains there
Was I, betwixt Urbino and the height,
Whence Tyber first unlocks his mighty flood.” 
     Leaning I listen’d yet with heedful ear,
When, as he touch’d my side, the leader thus: 
“Speak thou:  he is a Latian.”  My reply
Was ready, and I spake without delay: 
     “O spirit! who art hidden here below! 
Never was thy Romagna without war

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