Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 443 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Complete.
still,
Though conquer’d, by its mercy conquering. 
     “Those, in the eye who live the first and fifth,
Cause thee to marvel, in that thou behold’st
The region of the angels deck’d with them. 
They quitted not their bodies, as thou deem’st,
Gentiles but Christians, in firm rooted faith,
This of the feet in future to be pierc’d,
That of feet nail’d already to the cross. 
One from the barrier of the dark abyss,
Where never any with good will returns,
Came back unto his bones.  Of lively hope
Such was the meed; of lively hope, that wing’d
The prayers sent up to God for his release,
And put power into them to bend his will. 
The glorious Spirit, of whom I speak to thee,
A little while returning to the flesh,
Believ’d in him, who had the means to help,
And, in believing, nourish’d such a flame
Of holy love, that at the second death
He was made sharer in our gamesome mirth. 
The other, through the riches of that grace,
Which from so deep a fountain doth distil,
As never eye created saw its rising,
Plac’d all his love below on just and right: 
Wherefore of grace God op’d in him the eye
To the redemption of mankind to come;
Wherein believing, he endur’d no more
The filth of paganism, and for their ways
Rebuk’d the stubborn nations.  The three nymphs,
Whom at the right wheel thou beheldst advancing,
Were sponsors for him more than thousand years
Before baptizing.  O how far remov’d,
Predestination! is thy root from such
As see not the First cause entire:  and ye,
O mortal men! be wary how ye judge: 
For we, who see our Maker, know not yet
The number of the chosen:  and esteem
Such scantiness of knowledge our delight: 
For all our good is in that primal good
Concentrate, and God’s will and ours are one.” 
     So, by that form divine, was giv’n to me
Sweet medicine to clear and strengthen sight,
And, as one handling skillfully the harp,
Attendant on some skilful songster’s voice
Bids the chords vibrate, and therein the song
Acquires more pleasure; so, the whilst it spake,
It doth remember me, that I beheld
The pair of blessed luminaries move. 
Like the accordant twinkling of two eyes,
Their beamy circlets, dancing to the sounds.

CANTO XXI

Again mine eyes were fix’d on Beatrice,
And with mine eyes my soul, that in her looks
Found all contentment.  Yet no smile she wore
And, “Did I smile,” quoth she, “thou wouldst be straight
Like Semele when into ashes turn’d: 
For, mounting these eternal palace-stairs,
My beauty, which the loftier it climbs,
As thou hast noted, still doth kindle more,
So shines, that, were no temp’ring interpos’d,
Thy mortal puissance would from its rays
Shrink, as the leaf doth from the thunderbolt. 
Into the seventh splendour are we wafted,

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Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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