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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 443 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Complete.
     Thus did he come, deducing to this point,
And then concluded:  “For this cause behooves,
The roots, from whence your operations come,
Must differ.  Therefore one is Solon born;
Another, Xerxes; and Melchisidec
A third; and he a fourth, whose airy voyage
Cost him his son.  In her circuitous course,
Nature, that is the seal to mortal wax,
Doth well her art, but no distinctions owns
’Twixt one or other household.  Hence befalls
That Esau is so wide of Jacob:  hence
Quirinus of so base a father springs,
He dates from Mars his lineage.  Were it not
That providence celestial overrul’d,
Nature, in generation, must the path
Trac’d by the generator, still pursue
Unswervingly.  Thus place I in thy sight
That, which was late behind thee.  But, in sign
Of more affection for thee, ’t is my will
Thou wear this corollary.  Nature ever
Finding discordant fortune, like all seed
Out of its proper climate, thrives but ill. 
And were the world below content to mark
And work on the foundation nature lays,
It would not lack supply of excellence. 
But ye perversely to religion strain
Him, who was born to gird on him the sword,
And of the fluent phrasemen make your king;
Therefore your steps have wander’d from the paths.”

CANTO IX

After solution of my doubt, thy Charles,
O fair Clemenza, of the treachery spake
That must befall his seed:  but, “Tell it not,”
Said he, “and let the destin’d years come round.” 
Nor may I tell thee more, save that the meed
Of sorrow well-deserv’d shall quit your wrongs. 
     And now the visage of that saintly light
Was to the sun, that fills it, turn’d again,
As to the good, whose plenitude of bliss
Sufficeth all.  O ye misguided souls! 
Infatuate, who from such a good estrange
Your hearts, and bend your gaze on vanity,
Alas for you!—­And lo! toward me, next,
Another of those splendent forms approach’d,
That, by its outward bright’ning, testified
The will it had to pleasure me.  The eyes
Of Beatrice, resting, as before,
Firmly upon me, manifested forth
Approva1 of my wish.  “And O,” I cried,
Blest spirit! quickly be my will perform’d;
And prove thou to me, that my inmost thoughts
I can reflect on thee.”  Thereat the light,
That yet was new to me, from the recess,
Where it before was singing, thus began,
As one who joys in kindness:  “In that part
Of the deprav’d Italian land, which lies
Between Rialto, and the fountain-springs
Of Brenta and of Piava, there doth rise,
But to no lofty eminence, a hill,
From whence erewhile a firebrand did descend,
That sorely sheet the region.  From one root
I and it sprang; my name on earth Cunizza: 
And here I glitter, for that by its light
This star o’ercame me.  Yet I naught repine,

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