Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 104 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise.
If duly weigh’d, that argument is void,
Which oft might have perplex’d thee still.  But now
Another question thwarts thee, which to solve
Might try thy patience without better aid. 
I have, no doubt, instill’d into thy mind,
That blessed spirit may not lie; since near
The source of primal truth it dwells for aye: 
And thou might’st after of Piccarda learn
That Constance held affection to the veil;
So that she seems to contradict me here. 
Not seldom, brother, it hath chanc’d for men
To do what they had gladly left undone,
Yet to shun peril they have done amiss: 
E’en as Alcmaeon, at his father’s suit
Slew his own mother, so made pitiless
Not to lose pity.  On this point bethink thee,
That force and will are blended in such wise
As not to make the’ offence excusable. 
Absolute will agrees not to the wrong,
That inasmuch as there is fear of woe
From non-compliance, it agrees.  Of will
Thus absolute Piccarda spake, and I
Of th’ other; so that both have truly said.”

Such was the flow of that pure rill, that well’d
From forth the fountain of all truth; and such
The rest, that to my wond’ring thoughts I found.

“O thou of primal love the prime delight! 
Goddess!” I straight reply’d, “whose lively words
Still shed new heat and vigour through my soul! 
Affection fails me to requite thy grace
With equal sum of gratitude:  be his
To recompense, who sees and can reward thee. 
Well I discern, that by that truth alone
Enlighten’d, beyond which no truth may roam,
Our mind can satisfy her thirst to know: 
Therein she resteth, e’en as in his lair
The wild beast, soon as she hath reach’d that bound,
And she hath power to reach it; else desire
Were given to no end.  And thence doth doubt
Spring, like a shoot, around the stock of truth;
And it is nature which from height to height
On to the summit prompts us.  This invites,
This doth assure me, lady, rev’rently
To ask thee of other truth, that yet
Is dark to me.  I fain would know, if man
By other works well done may so supply
The failure of his vows, that in your scale
They lack not weight.”  I spake; and on me straight
Beatrice look’d with eyes that shot forth sparks
Of love celestial in such copious stream,
That, virtue sinking in me overpower’d,
I turn’d, and downward bent confus’d my sight.

CANTO V

“If beyond earthly wont, the flame of love
Illume me, so that I o’ercome thy power
Of vision, marvel not:  but learn the cause
In that perfection of the sight, which soon
As apprehending, hasteneth on to reach
The good it apprehends.  I well discern,
How in thine intellect already shines
The light eternal, which to view alone
Ne’er fails to kindle love; and if aught else
Your love seduces, ’t is but that it shows
Some ill-mark’d vestige of that primal beam.

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Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.