Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 104 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise.

“Lift up thy head, and be thou strong in trust: 
For that, which hither from the mortal world
Arriveth, must be ripen’d in our beam.”

Such cheering accents from the second flame
Assur’d me; and mine eyes I lifted up
Unto the mountains that had bow’d them late
With over-heavy burden.  “Sith our Liege
Wills of his grace that thou, or ere thy death,
In the most secret council, with his lords
Shouldst be confronted, so that having view’d
The glories of our court, thou mayst therewith
Thyself, and all who hear, invigorate
With hope, that leads to blissful end; declare,
What is that hope, how it doth flourish in thee,
And whence thou hadst it?” Thus proceeding still,
The second light:  and she, whose gentle love
My soaring pennons in that lofty flight
Escorted, thus preventing me, rejoin’d: 
Among her sons, not one more full of hope,
Hath the church militant:  so ’t is of him
Recorded in the sun, whose liberal orb
Enlighteneth all our tribe:  and ere his term
Of warfare, hence permitted he is come,
From Egypt to Jerusalem, to see. 
The other points, both which thou hast inquir’d,
Not for more knowledge, but that he may tell
How dear thou holdst the virtue, these to him
Leave I; for he may answer thee with ease,
And without boasting, so God give him grace.” 
Like to the scholar, practis’d in his task,
Who, willing to give proof of diligence,
Seconds his teacher gladly, “Hope,” said I,
“Is of the joy to come a sure expectance,
Th’ effect of grace divine and merit preceding. 
This light from many a star visits my heart,
But flow’d to me the first from him, who sang
The songs of the Supreme, himself supreme
Among his tuneful brethren.  ’Let all hope
In thee,’ so speak his anthem, ’who have known
Thy name;’ and with my faith who know not that? 
From thee, the next, distilling from his spring,
In thine epistle, fell on me the drops
So plenteously, that I on others shower
The influence of their dew.”  Whileas I spake,
A lamping, as of quick and vollied lightning,
Within the bosom of that mighty sheen,
Play’d tremulous; then forth these accents breath’d: 
“Love for the virtue which attended me
E’en to the palm, and issuing from the field,
Glows vigorous yet within me, and inspires
To ask of thee, whom also it delights;
What promise thou from hope in chief dost win.”

“Both scriptures, new and ancient,” I reply’d;
“Propose the mark (which even now I view)
For souls belov’d of God.  Isaias saith,
That, in their own land, each one must be clad
In twofold vesture; and their proper lands this delicious life. 
In terms more full,
And clearer far, thy brother hath set forth
This revelation to us, where he tells
Of the white raiment destin’d to the saints.” 
And, as the words were ending, from above,
“They hope in thee,” first heard we cried:  whereto
Answer’d the carols all.  Amidst them next,
A light of so clear amplitude emerg’d,
That winter’s month were but a single day,
Were such a crystal in the Cancer’s sign.

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Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.