Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 104 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise.
That hath so many lights, this being divides,
Through different essences, from it distinct,
And yet contain’d within it.  The other orbs
Their separate distinctions variously
Dispose, for their own seed and produce apt. 
Thus do these organs of the world proceed,
As thou beholdest now, from step to step,
Their influences from above deriving,
And thence transmitting downwards.  Mark me well,
How through this passage to the truth I ford,
The truth thou lov’st, that thou henceforth alone,
May’st know to keep the shallows, safe, untold.

“The virtue and motion of the sacred orbs,
As mallet by the workman’s hand, must needs
By blessed movers be inspir’d.  This heaven,
Made beauteous by so many luminaries,
From the deep spirit, that moves its circling sphere,
Its image takes an impress as a seal: 
And as the soul, that dwells within your dust,
Through members different, yet together form’d,
In different pow’rs resolves itself; e’en so
The intellectual efficacy unfolds
Its goodness multiplied throughout the stars;
On its own unity revolving still. 
Different virtue compact different
Makes with the precious body it enlivens,
With which it knits, as life in you is knit. 
From its original nature full of joy,
The virtue mingled through the body shines,
As joy through pupil of the living eye. 
From hence proceeds, that which from light to light
Seems different, and not from dense or rare. 
This is the formal cause, that generates
Proportion’d to its power, the dusk or clear.”

CANTO III

That sun, which erst with love my bosom warm’d
Had of fair truth unveil’d the sweet aspect,
By proof of right, and of the false reproof;
And I, to own myself convinc’d and free
Of doubt, as much as needed, rais’d my head
Erect for speech.  But soon a sight appear’d,
Which, so intent to mark it, held me fix’d,
That of confession I no longer thought.

As through translucent and smooth glass, or wave
Clear and unmov’d, and flowing not so deep
As that its bed is dark, the shape returns
So faint of our impictur’d lineaments,
That on white forehead set a pearl as strong
Comes to the eye:  such saw I many a face,
All stretch’d to speak, from whence I straight conceiv’d
Delusion opposite to that, which rais’d
Between the man and fountain, amorous flame.

Sudden, as I perceiv’d them, deeming these
Reflected semblances to see of whom
They were, I turn’d mine eyes, and nothing saw;
Then turn’d them back, directed on the light
Of my sweet guide, who smiling shot forth beams
From her celestial eyes.  “Wonder not thou,”
She cry’d, “at this my smiling, when I see
Thy childish judgment; since not yet on truth
It rests the foot, but, as it still is wont,
Makes thee fall back in unsound vacancy. 
True substances are these, which thou behold’st,
Hither through failure of their vow exil’d. 
But speak thou with them; listen, and believe,
That the true light, which fills them with desire,
Permits not from its beams their feet to stray.”

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Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.