Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 104 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise.
The isle of fire by old Anchises honour’d
Shall find his avarice there and cowardice;
And better to denote his littleness,
The writing must be letters maim’d, that speak
Much in a narrow space.  All there shall know
His uncle and his brother’s filthy doings,
Who so renown’d a nation and two crowns
Have bastardized.  And they, of Portugal
And Norway, there shall be expos’d with him
Of Ratza, who hath counterfeited ill
The coin of Venice.  O blest Hungary! 
If thou no longer patiently abid’st
Thy ill-entreating! and, O blest Navarre! 
If with thy mountainous girdle thou wouldst arm thee
In earnest of that day, e’en now are heard
Wailings and groans in Famagosta’s streets
And Nicosia’s, grudging at their beast,
Who keepeth even footing with the rest.”

CANTO XX

When, disappearing, from our hemisphere,
The world’s enlightener vanishes, and day
On all sides wasteth, suddenly the sky,
Erewhile irradiate only with his beam,
Is yet again unfolded, putting forth
Innumerable lights wherein one shines. 
Of such vicissitude in heaven I thought,
As the great sign, that marshaleth the world
And the world’s leaders, in the blessed beak
Was silent; for that all those living lights,
Waxing in splendour, burst forth into songs,
Such as from memory glide and fall away.

Sweet love! that dost apparel thee in smiles,
How lustrous was thy semblance in those sparkles,
Which merely are from holy thoughts inspir’d!

After the precious and bright beaming stones,
That did ingem the sixth light, ceas’d the chiming
Of their angelic bells; methought I heard
The murmuring of a river, that doth fall
From rock to rock transpicuous, making known
The richness of his spring-head:  and as sound
Of cistern, at the fret-board, or of pipe,
Is, at the wind-hole, modulate and tun’d;
Thus up the neck, as it were hollow, rose
That murmuring of the eagle, and forthwith
Voice there assum’d, and thence along the beak
Issued in form of words, such as my heart
Did look for, on whose tables I inscrib’d them.

“The part in me, that sees, and bears the sun,,
In mortal eagles,” it began, “must now
Be noted steadfastly:  for of the fires,
That figure me, those, glittering in mine eye,
Are chief of all the greatest.  This, that shines
Midmost for pupil, was the same, who sang
The Holy Spirit’s song, and bare about
The ark from town to town; now doth he know
The merit of his soul-impassion’d strains
By their well-fitted guerdon.  Of the five,
That make the circle of the vision, he
Who to the beak is nearest, comforted
The widow for her son:  now doth he know
How dear he costeth not to follow Christ,
Both from experience of this pleasant life,
And of its opposite.  He next, who follows

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Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.