Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 104 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise.

“Between Tupino, and the wave, that falls
From blest Ubaldo’s chosen hill, there hangs
Rich slope of mountain high, whence heat and cold
Are wafted through Perugia’s eastern gate: 
And Norcera with Gualdo, in its rear
Mourn for their heavy yoke.  Upon that side,
Where it doth break its steepness most, arose
A sun upon the world, as duly this
From Ganges doth:  therefore let none, who speak
Of that place, say Ascesi; for its name
Were lamely so deliver’d; but the East,
To call things rightly, be it henceforth styl’d. 
He was not yet much distant from his rising,
When his good influence ’gan to bless the earth. 
A dame to whom none openeth pleasure’s gate
More than to death, was, ’gainst his father’s will,
His stripling choice:  and he did make her his,
Before the Spiritual court, by nuptial bonds,
And in his father’s sight:  from day to day,
Then lov’d her more devoutly.  She, bereav’d
Of her first husband, slighted and obscure,
Thousand and hundred years and more, remain’d
Without a single suitor, till he came. 
Nor aught avail’d, that, with Amyclas, she
Was found unmov’d at rumour of his voice,
Who shook the world:  nor aught her constant boldness
Whereby with Christ she mounted on the cross,
When Mary stay’d beneath.  But not to deal
Thus closely with thee longer, take at large
The rovers’ titles—­Poverty and Francis. 
Their concord and glad looks, wonder and love,
And sweet regard gave birth to holy thoughts,
So much, that venerable Bernard first
Did bare his feet, and, in pursuit of peace
So heavenly, ran, yet deem’d his footing slow. 
O hidden riches!  O prolific good! 
Egidius bares him next, and next Sylvester,
And follow both the bridegroom; so the bride
Can please them.  Thenceforth goes he on his way,
The father and the master, with his spouse,
And with that family, whom now the cord
Girt humbly:  nor did abjectness of heart
Weigh down his eyelids, for that he was son
Of Pietro Bernardone, and by men
In wond’rous sort despis’d.  But royally
His hard intention he to Innocent
Set forth, and from him first receiv’d the seal
On his religion.  Then, when numerous flock’d
The tribe of lowly ones, that trac’d his steps,
Whose marvellous life deservedly were sung
In heights empyreal, through Honorius’ hand
A second crown, to deck their Guardian’s virtues,
Was by the eternal Spirit inwreath’d:  and when
He had, through thirst of martyrdom, stood up
In the proud Soldan’s presence, and there preach’d
Christ and his followers; but found the race
Unripen’d for conversion:  back once more
He hasted (not to intermit his toil),
And reap’d Ausonian lands.  On the hard rock,
’Twixt Arno and the Tyber, he from Christ
Took the last Signet, which his limbs two years
Did carry.  Then the season come, that he,

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Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Paradise from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.