Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Purgatory eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 107 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Purgatory.
There hope to rest thee from thy toil.  No more
I answer, and thus far for certain know.” 
As he his words had spoken, near to us
A voice there sounded:  “Yet ye first perchance
May to repose you by constraint be led.” 
At sound thereof each turn’d, and on the left
A huge stone we beheld, of which nor I
Nor he before was ware.  Thither we drew,
find there were some, who in the shady place
Behind the rock were standing, as a man
Thru’ idleness might stand.  Among them one,
Who seem’d to me much wearied, sat him down,
And with his arms did fold his knees about,
Holding his face between them downward bent.

“Sweet Sir!” I cry’d, “behold that man, who shows
Himself more idle, than if laziness
Were sister to him.”  Straight he turn’d to us,
And, o’er the thigh lifting his face, observ’d,
Then in these accents spake:  “Up then, proceed
Thou valiant one.”  Straight who it was I knew;
Nor could the pain I felt (for want of breath
Still somewhat urg’d me) hinder my approach. 
And when I came to him, he scarce his head
Uplifted, saying “Well hast thou discern’d,
How from the left the sun his chariot leads.”

His lazy acts and broken words my lips
To laughter somewhat mov’d; when I began: 
“Belacqua, now for thee I grieve no more. 
But tell, why thou art seated upright there? 
Waitest thou escort to conduct thee hence? 
Or blame I only shine accustom’d ways?”
Then he:  “My brother, of what use to mount,
When to my suffering would not let me pass
The bird of God, who at the portal sits? 
Behooves so long that heav’n first bear me round
Without its limits, as in life it bore,
Because I to the end repentant Sighs
Delay’d, if prayer do not aid me first,
That riseth up from heart which lives in grace. 
What other kind avails, not heard in heaven?"’

Before me now the Poet up the mount
Ascending, cried:  “Haste thee, for see the sun
Has touch’d the point meridian, and the night
Now covers with her foot Marocco’s shore.”

CANTO V

Now had I left those spirits, and pursued
The steps of my Conductor, when beheld
Pointing the finger at me one exclaim’d: 
“See how it seems as if the light not shone
From the left hand of him beneath, and he,
As living, seems to be led on.”  Mine eyes
I at that sound reverting, saw them gaze
Through wonder first at me, and then at me
And the light broken underneath, by turns. 
“Why are thy thoughts thus riveted?” my guide
Exclaim’d, “that thou hast slack’d thy pace? or how
Imports it thee, what thing is whisper’d here? 
Come after me, and to their babblings leave
The crowd.  Be as a tower, that, firmly set,
Shakes not its top for any blast that blows! 
He, in whose bosom thought on thought shoots out,
Still of his aim is wide, in that the one
Sicklies and wastes to nought the other’s strength.”

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Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Purgatory from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.