Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Purgatory eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 107 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Purgatory.

“Love that discourses in my thoughts.”  He then
Began in such soft accents, that within
The sweetness thrills me yet.  My gentle guide
And all who came with him, so well were pleas’d,
That seem’d naught else might in their thoughts have room.

Fast fix’d in mute attention to his notes
We stood, when lo! that old man venerable
Exclaiming, “How is this, ye tardy spirits? 
What negligence detains you loit’ring here? 
Run to the mountain to cast off those scales,
That from your eyes the sight of God conceal.”

As a wild flock of pigeons, to their food
Collected, blade or tares, without their pride
Accustom’d, and in still and quiet sort,
If aught alarm them, suddenly desert
Their meal, assail’d by more important care;
So I that new-come troop beheld, the song
Deserting, hasten to the mountain’s side,
As one who goes yet where he tends knows not.

Nor with less hurried step did we depart.

CANTO III

Them sudden flight had scatter’d over the plain,
Turn’d tow’rds the mountain, whither reason’s voice
Drives us; I to my faithful company
Adhering, left it not.  For how of him
Depriv’d, might I have sped, or who beside
Would o’er the mountainous tract have led my steps
He with the bitter pang of self-remorse
Seem’d smitten.  O clear conscience and upright
How doth a little fling wound thee sore!

Soon as his feet desisted (slack’ning pace),
From haste, that mars all decency of act,
My mind, that in itself before was wrapt,
Its thoughts expanded, as with joy restor’d: 
And full against the steep ascent I set
My face, where highest to heav’n its top o’erflows.

The sun, that flar’d behind, with ruddy beam
Before my form was broken; for in me
His rays resistance met.  I turn’d aside
With fear of being left, when I beheld
Only before myself the ground obscur’d. 
When thus my solace, turning him around,
Bespake me kindly:  “Why distrustest thou? 
Believ’st not I am with thee, thy sure guide? 
It now is evening there, where buried lies
The body, in which I cast a shade, remov’d
To Naples from Brundusium’s wall.  Nor thou
Marvel, if before me no shadow fall,
More than that in the sky element
One ray obstructs not other.  To endure
Torments of heat and cold extreme, like frames
That virtue hath dispos’d, which how it works
Wills not to us should be reveal’d.  Insane
Who hopes, our reason may that space explore,
Which holds three persons in one substance knit. 
Seek not the wherefore, race of human kind;
Could ye have seen the whole, no need had been
For Mary to bring forth.  Moreover ye
Have seen such men desiring fruitlessly;
To whose desires repose would have been giv’n,
That now but serve them for eternal grief. 
I speak of Plato, and the Stagyrite,

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Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Purgatory from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.