Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Hell eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 106 pages of information about Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Hell.
Down falls, and winds a river flood beneath
Through the green pastures.  Soon as in his course
The steam makes head, Benacus then no more
They call the name, but Mincius, till at last
Reaching Governo into Po he falls. 
Not far his course hath run, when a wide flat
It finds, which overstretchmg as a marsh
It covers, pestilent in summer oft. 
Hence journeying, the savage maiden saw
’Midst of the fen a territory waste
And naked of inhabitants.  To shun
All human converse, here she with her slaves
Plying her arts remain’d, and liv’d, and left
Her body tenantless.  Thenceforth the tribes,
Who round were scatter’d, gath’ring to that place
Assembled; for its strength was great, enclos’d
On all parts by the fen.  On those dead bones
They rear’d themselves a city, for her sake,
Calling it Mantua, who first chose the spot,
Nor ask’d another omen for the name,
Wherein more numerous the people dwelt,
Ere Casalodi’s madness by deceit
Was wrong’d of Pinamonte.  If thou hear
Henceforth another origin assign’d
Of that my country, I forewarn thee now,
That falsehood none beguile thee of the truth.”

I answer’d:  “Teacher, I conclude thy words
So certain, that all else shall be to me
As embers lacking life.  But now of these,
Who here proceed, instruct me, if thou see
Any that merit more especial note. 
For thereon is my mind alone intent.”

He straight replied:  “That spirit, from whose cheek
The beard sweeps o’er his shoulders brown, what time
Graecia was emptied of her males, that scarce
The cradles were supplied, the seer was he
In Aulis, who with Calchas gave the sign
When first to cut the cable.  Him they nam’d
Eurypilus:  so sings my tragic strain,
In which majestic measure well thou know’st,
Who know’st it all.  That other, round the loins
So slender of his shape, was Michael Scot,
Practis’d in ev’ry slight of magic wile.

“Guido Bonatti see:  Asdente mark,
Who now were willing, he had tended still
The thread and cordwain; and too late repents.

“See next the wretches, who the needle left,
The shuttle and the spindle, and became
Diviners:  baneful witcheries they wrought
With images and herbs.  But onward now: 
For now doth Cain with fork of thorns confine
On either hemisphere, touching the wave
Beneath the towers of Seville.  Yesternight
The moon was round.  Thou mayst remember well: 
For she good service did thee in the gloom
Of the deep wood.”  This said, both onward mov’d.

CANTO XXI

Thus we from bridge to bridge, with other talk,
The which my drama cares not to rehearse,
Pass’d on; and to the summit reaching, stood
To view another gap, within the round
Of Malebolge, other bootless pangs.

Marvelous darkness shadow’d o’er the place.

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Divine Comedy, Cary's Translation, Hell from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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