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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 182 pages of information about Edgar Allan Poe's Complete Poetical Works.

MEMOIR

Poems of later life
  Dedication
  Preface
  The Raven
  The Bells
  Ulalume
  To Helen
  Annabel Lee
  A Valentine
  An Enigma
  To my Mother
  For Annie
  To F——­
  To Frances S. Osgood
  Eldorado
  Eulalie
  A Dream within a Dream
  To Marie Louise (Shew)
  To the Same
  The City in the Sea
  The Sleeper,
  Bridal Ballad
Notes

Poems of manhood
  Lenore
  To one in Paradise
  The Coliseum
  The Haunted Palace
  The Conqueror Worm
  Silence
  Dreamland
  To Zante
  Hymn
Notes

Scenes fromPolitian
Note

Poems of youth
  Introduction (1831)
  To Science
  Al Aaraaf
  Tamerlane
  To Helen
  The Valley of Unrest
  Israfel
  To——­("I heed not that my earthly lot”)
  To——­("The bowers whereat, in dreams, I see”)
  To the River——­
  Song
  Spirits of the Dead
  A Dream
  Romance
  Fairyland
  The Lake
  Evening Star
  Imitation
  “The Happiest Day,”
  Hymn.  Translation from the Greek
  Dreams
  “In Youth I have known one”
  A Paean
Notes

Doubtful poems
  Alone
  To Isadore
  The Village Street
  The Forest Reverie
Notes

Prose poems
  The Island of the Fay
  The Power of Words
  The Colloquy of Monos and Una
  The Conversation of Eiros and Charmion
  Shadow—­A Parable
  Silence—­A Fable

Essays
  The Poetic Principle
  The Philosophy of Composition
  Old English Poetry

MEMOIR OF EDGAR ALLAN POE.

During the last few years every incident in the life of Edgar Poe has been subjected to microscopic investigation.  The result has not been altogether satisfactory.  On the one hand, envy and prejudice have magnified every blemish of his character into crime, whilst on the other, blind admiration would depict him as far “too good for human nature’s daily food.”  Let us endeavor to judge him impartially, granting that he was as a mortal subject to the ordinary weaknesses of mortality, but that he was tempted sorely, treated badly, and suffered deeply.

The poet’s ancestry and parentage are chiefly interesting as explaining some of the complexities of his character.  His father, David Poe, was of Anglo-Irish extraction.  Educated for the Bar, he elected to abandon it for the stage.  In one of his tours through the chief towns of the United States he met and married a young actress, Elizabeth Arnold, member of an English family distinguished for its musical talents.  As an actress, Elizabeth Poe acquired some reputation, but became even better

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