Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 83 pages of information about Carmilla.

Carmilla was leaning on her hand dejectedly; Madame and I were listening breathlessly.

“Now, my question is this.  Have you ever been suspected of walking in your sleep?”

“Never, since I was very young indeed.”

“But you did walk in your sleep when you were young?”

“Yes; I know I did.  I have been told so often by my old nurse.”

My father smiled and nodded.

“Well, what has happened is this.  You got up in your sleep, unlocked the door, not leaving the key, as usual, in the lock, but taking it out and locking it on the outside; you again took the key out, and carried it away with you to some one of the five-and-twenty rooms on this floor, or perhaps upstairs or downstairs.  There are so many rooms and closets, so much heavy furniture, and such accumulations of lumber, that it would require a week to search this old house thoroughly.  Do you see, now, what I mean?”

“I do, but not all,” she answered.

“And how, papa, do you account for her finding herself on the sofa in the dressing room, which we had searched so carefully?”

“She came there after you had searched it, still in her sleep, and at last awoke spontaneously, and was as much surprised to find herself where she was as any one else.  I wish all mysteries were as easily and innocently explained as yours, Carmilla,” he said, laughing.  “And so we may congratulate ourselves on the certainty that the most natural explanation of the occurrence is one that involves no drugging, no tampering with locks, no burglars, or poisoners, or witches—­nothing that need alarm Carmilla, or anyone else, for our safety.”

Carmilla was looking charmingly.  Nothing could be more beautiful than her tints.  Her beauty was, I think, enhanced by that graceful languor that was peculiar to her.  I think my father was silently contrasting her looks with mine, for he said: 

“I wish my poor Laura was looking more like herself”; and he sighed.

So our alarms were happily ended, and Carmilla restored to her friends.

IX

The Doctor

As Carmilla would not hear of an attendant sleeping in her room, my father arranged that a servant should sleep outside her door, so that she would not attempt to make another such excursion without being arrested at her own door.

That night passed quietly; and next morning early, the doctor, whom my father had sent for without telling me a word about it, arrived to see me.

Madame accompanied me to the library; and there the grave little doctor, with white hair and spectacles, whom I mentioned before, was waiting to receive me.

I told him my story, and as I proceeded he grew graver and graver.

We were standing, he and I, in the recess of one of the windows, facing one another.  When my statement was over, he leaned with his shoulders against the wall, and with his eyes fixed on me earnestly, with an interest in which was a dash of horror.

Follow Us on Facebook