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There are 13 critical essays on William Hazlitt.

Critical Essays on William Hazlitt
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Critical Essay by Laurie Kane Lew
18,625 words, approx. 62 pages
In the following essay, Lew discusses Hazlitt's essays as a series of portraits from which Lew determines his theory of memory and his understanding of artistic appreciation.
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Critical Essay by Raymond Martin and John Barresi
8,708 words, approx. 29 pages
In the following essay, Martin and Barresi examine Hazlitt's theories of personal identity, focusing particularly on how they relate to modern philosophies.
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Critical Essay by Marilyn Butler
8,404 words, approx. 28 pages
In this essay, Butler examines the satirical elements that appear in some Romantic writings, as well as the extent to which Liber Amoris can be considered a satiric commentary on contemporary doctrines of the imagination.
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Critical Essay by Joseph Epstein
8,197 words, approx. 27 pages
In the following essay, Epstein places Hazlitt's writings within the context of his business and personal life.
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Critical Essay by Robert Ready
7,747 words, approx. 26 pages
In the following essay, Ready evaluates Liber Amoris as a literary exploration into the nature of the sympathetic imagination.
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Critical Essay by Jonathan Gross
6,809 words, approx. 23 pages
In the following essay, Gross argues that Liber Amoris "reveals the growth of [Hazlitt's fetishistic imagination," which both fueled his creative sensibilities and helped refine his theory of religious practice.]
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Critical Essay by James Mulvihill
6,177 words, approx. 21 pages
In this essay, Mulvihill contends that Hazlitt's method of inferring character is not impressionistic, as has been claimed, but empiricist, using seemingly insignificant traits to discover the general principles of character.
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Critical Essay by James Mulvihill
5,245 words, approx. 18 pages
In the following essay, Mulvihill attempts to reevaluate Liber Amoris, which he contends is not an unseemly self-exposure, but an analysis of the feeling of infatuation itself.
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Critical Essay by Harold Bloom
5,012 words, approx. 17 pages
In the following introduction to a collection of critical essays on Hazlitt, Bloom contends that Hazlitt 's "poetics of power" chronicles the difficult relationship between imagination and experience, oneself and others.
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W. P. Albrecht
4,876 words, approx. 16 pages
In the following essay, Albrecht examines the dialectic of reason versus imagination that characterizes William Hazlitt's "On the Fear of Death," in which he concludes that fear of death can best be allayed by setting "a just value on life. "
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Critical Essay by Nancy Enright
4,283 words, approx. 14 pages
In the essay that follows, Enright discusses the careful balance between stiff overformality and amateurish lack of style that characterizes the ideal of Hazlitt's "Familiar Style."
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Critical Essay by Edward W. Bratton
3,611 words, approx. 12 pages
In the essay that follows, originally published in 1991, Bratton explores some examples of Hazlitt's judgments of taste in an effort to determine the paradoxes of his overarching theory and its relevance to the twentieth century.
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Critical Essay by John L. Mahoney
3,505 words, approx. 12 pages
In the following essay, Mahoney contends that Hazlitt's essay represents a move away from the formal treatise—and toward a more familiar style of writing about aesthetics that would become popular in the nineteenth century.


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