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There are 11 critical essays on Washington Irving.

Critical Essays on Washington Irving
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Critical Essay by Laura J. Murray
11,114 words, approx. 37 pages
In the following essay, Murray discusses early American views on identity and nationality through an analysis of the works of Irving and William Apess.
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Critical Essay by Marjorie Pryse
9,991 words, approx. 33 pages
In the following essay, Pryse explores the advent of regionalism by comparing Harriet Beecher Stowe's “Uncle Lot” to Irving's “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle.”
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Critical Essay by Brian Harding
9,057 words, approx. 30 pages
In the following essay, Harding probes Irving's complex relationship with Western expansion as evident in A Tour on the Prairies, Astoria, and The Adventures of Captain Bonneville.
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Critical Essay by Alexander Hill Everett
8,866 words, approx. 30 pages
In the following review, Everett compares A History of the Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus to Irving's earlier works, describing his skill as a writer of humor, satire, and history.
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Critical Essay by Walter Sondey
8,120 words, approx. 27 pages
In the following essay, Sondey demonstrates how Irving's use of nostalgia in Salmagundi and The Sketch Book promoted his views on conservatism and the national identity.
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Critical Essay by Eugene Current-Garcia
8,111 words, approx. 27 pages
In the following excerpt, Current-Garcia focuses on the tales and sketches of Washington Irving, suggesting that while Irving “did not actually invent the short story, he set the pattern for the artistic re-creation of common experience in short fictional form” that was later employed and improved by Poe and Hawthorne.
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Critical Essay by Alice Hiller
7,025 words, approx. 23 pages
In the following essay, Hiller traces the events which influenced The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Grayon, Gent., arguing that with this work, Irving lost his distinctive voice.
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Critical Essay by Jenifer S. Banks
5,408 words, approx. 18 pages
In the following essay, Banks analyzes Irving's conflict between individual freedom and social responsibility as evidenced in his writings about women and his life.
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Critical Essay by John Lambert
5,056 words, approx. 17 pages
In the following essay, Lambert explains the nature of the essays in Salmagundi and the particular qualities of American culture.
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Critical Essay by Ladies' Repository
4,254 words, approx. 14 pages
In the following essay, the critic praises Irving as a writer of the highest quality, forever to be remembered and revered.
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Critical Essay by Susan M. Catalano
2,580 words, approx. 9 pages
In the following essay, Catalano compares “Rip Van Winkle” to Hemingway's “The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber,” arguing that both protagonists share a transformation against the powers of female authority.


Works by the Author

There are 7 critical essays on literary works by Washington Irving.

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

Rip Van Winkle



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