There are 14 critical essays on The Heidi Chronicles.

Critical Essays on The Heidi Chronicles
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Interview by Wendy Wasserstein and The Playwright's Art
9,415 words, approx. 31 pages
In the following interview, originally conducted on October 9, 1991, Wasserstein discusses her early career and the implications of her success, aspects of her writing process, the influence and role of women in contemporary theatre, and the critical and popular reception of her plays, particularly The Heidi Chronicles, both in the United States and abroad.
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Critical Essay by Helene Keyssar
8,873 words, approx. 30 pages
In the following essay, Keyssar contrasts the semiotic differences between The Heidi Chronicles and Maria Irene Fornes's Fefu and Her Friends, refuting the contention by philosopher-critic Mikhail Bakhtin that all dramatic literature is “monologic” by demonstrating the confluence between Bakhtinian criticism and contemporary feminist thought.
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Critical Essay by Phyllis Jane Rose
3,051 words, approx. 10 pages
Rose was the founder of the Roses International Women's Theater and Softball Syndicate. In the excerpt below, written in the form of a letter dated 1 October 1989 to the protagonist of The Heidi Chronicles, she accuses the play's eponymous heroine of complicitly participating in the oppression of women and challenges her to actively oppose the patriarchal ways of contemporary society.
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Critical Essay by Helene Keyssar
1,550 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following excerpt, Keyssar expresses her disappointment with the tremendous success of The Heidi Chronicles. She contends that, according to Mikhail Bakhtin's definition of meaningful theater, in which drama is "simultaneously entire unto itself and part of the whole culture," The Heidi Chronicles is "aggressively monologic" and "self-contained," thus alienating large segments of society.
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Critical Essay by Wendy Wasserstein
1,295 words, approx. 4 pages
In the essay below, Wasserstein discusses her reaction to winning the Pulitzer Prize for The Heidi Chronicles.
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Critical Review by Gayle Austin
1,139 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, Austin discusses characterization in The Heidi Chronicles and feminist reaction to the play. She notes that although the play has been lauded by some feminists for its focus on women, others argue that the work portrays women in traditional roles and has the potential to "become part of the system that oppresses women and so highly rewards their creative expressions when they aid in its purposes."
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Critical Review by Kate Davy
1,092 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, Davy assesses the critical and commercial success of The Heidi Chronicles within the context of contemporary feminist concerns.
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Critical Review by Claudia Barnett
1,069 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, Barnett appraises the cultural significance of An American Daughter, contrasting its feminist perspective with that of The Heidi Chronicles.
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Critical Review by Gerald Weales
792 words, approx. 3 pages
An American novelist and drama critic, Weales is the author of such books as American Drama since World War II (1962) and The Jumping-Off Place: American Drama in the 1960s (1969). In the following excerpt from a review of a Broadway performance of The Heidi Chronicles, he comments on the play's major weaknesses, particularly centering on the character of Heidi, whom he considers both unconvincing and lacking in dramatic interest.
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Critical Review by Gerald Weales
745 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Weales highlights the weaknesses of The Heidi Chronicles, examining the effects of its protagonist's flat characterization on the whole play.
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Critical Review by Richard Hornby
672 words, approx. 2 pages
An educator, critic, and nonfiction writer, Hornby teaches and writes about drama. In the following, he offers a negative assessment of The Heidi Chronicles.
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Critical Review by Graydon Carter
467 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following unfavorable review, Carter characterizes The Heidi Chronicles, as "Off-Broadway lite" and reminiscent of television sitcoms.
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Critical Review by Ray Olson
335 words, approx. 1 pages
In the following review of The Heidi Chronicles, and Other Plays, Olson compares Wasserstein's plays to the work of Mary McCarthy and Philip Barry.
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Critical Review by Thomas E. Luddy
149 words, approx. 1 pages
In the following review, Luddy favorably assesses The Heidi Chronicles, and Other Plays.


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