There are 19 critical essays on Pride and Prejudice.

Critical Essays on Pride and Prejudice
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Critical Essay by Anne Waldron Neumann
15,244 words, approx. 51 pages
In the following essay, Neumann studies the speech and thought of Pride and Prejudice, calling attention to Austen's use of “double-voiced verbs,” or verbs that “conflate narration with reported discourse.”
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Critical Essay by William Christie
10,722 words, approx. 36 pages
In the following essay, Christie finds that in Pride and Prejudice, a novel deeply concerned with the pressing political issues of the day, Austen's compromise between conservatism and progressivism is ultimately a “collapse of the progressive position.”
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Critical Essay by Sandra Peña Cervel
10,453 words, approx. 35 pages
In the following essay, Cervel analyzes Pride and Prejudice from the perspective of Cognitive Linguistics, a conceptual model for reality that, Cervel argues, Austen's novel exhibits.
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Critical Essay by Joseph Wiesenfarth
10,290 words, approx. 34 pages
In the following essay, Wiesenfarth defends the aesthetic greatness of Pride and Prejudice, arguing that its plot is a sophisticated method of erecting an ideal value system.
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Critical Essay by Kenneth L. Moler
10,092 words, approx. 34 pages
In the following essay, Moler discusses the relationship between Pride and Prejudice and the novels of Fanny Burney and Samuel Richardson.
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Critical Essay by Jean Ferguson Carr
8,765 words, approx. 29 pages
In the following essay, Carr analyzes the role of the mother in Pride and Prejudice, focusing on Mrs. Bennet's exclusion from the social world.
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Critical Essay by Nora Foster Stovel
8,290 words, approx. 28 pages
In the following essay, Foster Stovel examines Elizabeth's first impressions of Mr. Darcy, claiming that the reader knows they are destined for each other from the beginning because of Austen's “classic comic structure.”
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Critical Essay by Gary Kelly
8,043 words, approx. 27 pages
In the following essay, Kelly explores the role of reading in Pride and Prejudice, drawing a parallel between Elizabeth's inclination to read her world like a book and the reader's epistemological approach to the novel.
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Critical Essay by Gordon Hirsch
7,808 words, approx. 26 pages
In the following essay, Hirsch discusses Pride and Prejudice in the light of modern psychology, focusing on the role of shame in the novel.
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Critical Essay by Susan Reilly
7,153 words, approx. 24 pages
In the following essay, Reilly stresses that, through her portrayal of the ideal and picturesque private estate at Pemberley, Austen reinforces English nationalism and decries the “dangerous enthusiasms of New World democratic ideals.”
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Critical Essay by Judith Lowder Newton
7,132 words, approx. 24 pages
In the following essay, Newton examines the power dynamic in Pride and Prejudice, arguing that although men dominated Austen's society in economic and social privilege, Elizabeth Bennet represents a fantasy of female autonomy.
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Critical Essay by Joseph Litvak
6,273 words, approx. 21 pages
In the following essay, Litvak explores the ideas of disgust and pleasure in the various contexts in which they are presented in Pride and Prejudice.
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Critical Essay by Rachel M. Brownstein
5,437 words, approx. 18 pages
In the following essay, Brownstein focuses on several of Austen's novels, including Pride and Prejudice, to support her argument that Austen uses irony to convey a “discursive authority” from which women can derive pleasure in a patriarchal society.
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Critical Essay by Julia Prewitt Brown
5,065 words, approx. 17 pages
In the following essay, Brown discusses the ways in which Austen's novel depicts early nineteenth-century society, arguing that Austen explores the defining historical realities of her era.
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Critical Essay by Matthew Schneider
4,975 words, approx. 17 pages
In the following essay, Schneider argues that card-playing serves as an apt metaphor for the courtship ritual in Pride and Prejudice.
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Critical Essay by Dvora Zelicovici
4,743 words, approx. 16 pages
In the following essay, Zelicovici concentrates on the third volume of Pride and Prejudice, contending that it is vital in developing Mr. Darcy's and Elizabeth's reversals of conviction.
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Critical Essay by Bruce Stovel
4,177 words, approx. 14 pages
In the following essay, Stovel asserts that Austen's novel allows for the interpretation that Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy's relationship is an example of ideal love, as well as the view that it is an “immediate and magnetic attraction.”
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Critical Essay by Barbara K. Seeber
2,973 words, approx. 10 pages
In the following essay, which applies Mikhail Bakhtin's linguistic theory of dialogism to Austen's works, Seeber concludes that Pride and Prejudice remains “haunted” by the narrative of Wickham and Georgiana despite the main narrative's repression of this material.
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Critical Essay by A. Walton Litz
2,409 words, approx. 8 pages
In the following essay, Litz discusses Austen's use of landscape in Pride and Prejudice, focusing on how she employs “picturesque moments” to establish meaning and form.


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