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There are 11 critical essays on Oedipus the King.

Critical Essays on Oedipus the King
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Critical Essay by Mark Ringer
13,300 words, approx. 44 pages
In the following excerpt, Ringer analyzes the different levels of illusion Sophocles uses in his Theban plays and discusses the audience's involvement in these illusions.
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Critical Essay by Alister Cameron
12,605 words, approx. 42 pages
In the following excerpt, Cameron discusses what can be learned from Oedipus Tyrannus concerning guilt, the past, and fate.
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Critical Essay by Charles Segal
11,498 words, approx. 38 pages
In the following excerpt, Segal discusses how indefinite descriptions of time in Oedipus Tyrannus are part of what obscures the identity of Laius's killer.
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Critical Essay by Erich Fromm
10,955 words, approx. 37 pages
In the following excerpt, Fromm contends that Oedipus Tyrannus must be examined in conjunction with Oedipus at Colonus and Antigone in order for its theme of the son rebelling against patriarchal control to be fully explicated.
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Critical Essay by Eric A. Havelock
10,208 words, approx. 34 pages
In the following essay, Havelock describes elements of oral composition that can be found in the text of Oedipus Tyrannus.
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Critical Essay by R. Drew Griffith
8,996 words, approx. 30 pages
In the following excerpt, Griffith examines the cases for and against Oedipus and explains why he is guilty of murder.
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Critical Essay by Richard Fabrizio
6,136 words, approx. 21 pages
In the following essay, Fabrizio examines how Giovanni Andrea dell'Anguillara, a Renaissance writer, dealt with what he deemed inconsistencies of characterization in his adaptation of Sophocles's text.
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Critical Essay by Philip Wheelwright
4,369 words, approx. 15 pages
In the following essay, originally published in 1954, Wheelwright argues that a key to understanding the meaning of Oedipus Tyrannus is found in its Greek title, which the critic renders as Oedipus the Usurper.
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Critical Essay by Jonathan Culler
4,361 words, approx. 15 pages
In the following essay, Culler uses Oedipus Tyrannus to illustrate some of his points concerning the importance of semiotics in literary criticism.
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Critical Essay by Francis Fergusson
2,428 words, approx. 8 pages
In the following essay, originally published in 1949, Fergusson describes the ritual involved in the audience's reception of Oedipus Tyrannus and the importance and function of the chorus.
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Critical Essay by Bernhard Frank
610 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following essay, Frank contends that during the climax of Oedipus Tyrannus, Oedipus reverses roles with Jocasta.


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