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There are 8 critical essays on Louis L'Amour.

Critical Essays on Louis L'Amour
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Critical Essay by John D. Nesbitt
2,618 words, approx. 9 pages
To the person who reads with a slightly less abandoned mind, and to the critic who does not dismiss L'Amour with ridicule and contempt, L'Amour's novels are not just the same old story with the hero of each new volume given a different name and a different colored horse. His books have changed over the years, independently of story lines or plot formulas, according to an apparent change in moral and historical purpose. L'Amour's career can be divided into three phases ...
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Critical Essay by Michael T. Marsden
869 words, approx. 3 pages
Louis L'Amour is the best selling Western writer of all-time. The reasons for his remarkable success in the marketplace are many, but none seems as pervasive or as consistently developed in his fiction as the concept of the family in the West. The families in L'Amour's fiction, for example, his famous Sacketts, are often uprooted and transplanted from Eastern Soil to the Western landscape with their civilized virtues intact. Their romantic, idealistic, familiar attitudes serve them well...
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Critical Essay by John D. Nesbitt
706 words, approx. 2 pages
Readers who wish to get a full sense of Louis L'Amour's productions, for whatever purposes, must inevitably take on his two blockbusters, Bendigo Shafter and Comstock Lode. These two novels, in their separate ways, continue the historical mode that L'Amour launched into with Sackett's Land, Rivers West, and Fair Blows the Wind, with the exception that the main characters of the later two novels are not members of the Sackett, Talon, or Chantry families. Both are marketed as histo...
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Critical Essay by Michael T. Marsden
629 words, approx. 2 pages
Popular Western fiction has strong ties to the oral tradition in American culture. In his works, L'Amour clearly considers himself to be in the tradition of the oral storyteller…. (p. 206) [In] the case of the oral storyteller, the writer is expected to be the spokesperson for the "community." This role is especially clear in the fiction of Louis L'Amour which reveals how a writer can function as a cultural filter, creating what become artifacts of immense significance for...
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Critical Essay by Paul Bailey
359 words, approx. 1 pages
[In The Burning Hills Louis L'Amour] made his one and only attempt at Literature—but Literature lost, and Louis L'Amour became famous. Twenty years ago, L'Amour was obviously under the influence of T. S. Eliot: The Burning Hills contains dozens of references to "The Hollow Men" and the final section of The Waste Land. Early in the narrative, the hero, Trace Jordan, scoops up "a handful of dust" from the "red rock" in the shadow of which h...
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Critical Essay by Steve Berner
218 words, approx. 1 pages
In Comstock Lode L'Amour tells, obviously, the story of people caught up in the great silver rush that played such an important part in this nation's history. If some of the writing is flat, and some of the characters incomplete or contradictory, well much the same can be said of life itself. It is, in fact, pointless to discuss either the merits or weaknesses of L'Amour's writings, both of which abound, since it will have little or no effect on either the author or his public, w...
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Critical Essay by John Pivovarnick
174 words, approx. 1 pages
Louis L'Amour's [The Cherokee Trail] is both a little more and a little less than what I expected of the famed King of the Oat Epic. It was more than I expected simply in the fact that I enjoyed it….
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Critical Essay by Jon Tuska
170 words, approx. 1 pages
[Hondo] remains a fine book unlike those which profligacy have recently made tediously repetitious. Hondo Lane is one of L'Amour's most engaging and interesting characters, rivaling in another genre Dashiell Hammett's creation of Ned Beaumont in The Glass Key in 1931 or Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe before Marlowe became sentimental. Hondo is self-reliant, capable without being excessively aggressive, sufficient unto himself without surrendering to greed…. Hondo is abl...


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