There are 16 critical essays on Katherine Mansfield.

Critical Essays on Katherine Mansfield
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Critical Essay by Christine Darrohn
10,356 words, approx. 35 pages
In the following essay, Darrohn contends that “The Garden Party” explores issues of class and gender as well as the devastating impact of World War I on Mansfield's generation.
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Critical Essay by Chantal Cornut-Gentille D'Arcy
8,550 words, approx. 29 pages
In the following essay, D'Arcy examines the political commentary and sexual politics found in “Bliss.”
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Critical Essay by Janet Winston
8,333 words, approx. 28 pages
In the following essay, Winston explores the connection between Mansfield's “Carnation” and Virginia Woolf's “Moments of Being: ‘Slater's Pins Have No Points.’”
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Critical Essay by Jane Stafford and Mark Williams
8,048 words, approx. 27 pages
In the following essay, Stafford and Williams elucidate Mansfield's attitude toward her homeland of New Zealand and consider her place in the movement of literary nationalism known as Maoriland.
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Critical Essay by David Trotter
6,789 words, approx. 23 pages
In the following essay, Trotter discusses Relevance Theory, a version of pragmatics, as applied to Mansfield's “A Cup of Tea” and James Joyce's Ulysses.
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Critical Essay by Colin Norman
6,390 words, approx. 21 pages
In the following essay, Norman identifies T. S. Eliot's poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” as an influence on Mansfield's“The Daughters of the Late Colonel.”
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Critical Essay by Armine Kotin Mortimer
6,367 words, approx. 21 pages
In the following essay, Mortimer provides a reading of the “second story” found near the end of “Bliss.”
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Critical Essay by Thomas Dilworth
5,673 words, approx. 19 pages
In the following essay, Dilworth views evolution as a central theme in “Bliss” and deems the story as “a wonderful aesthetic achievement.”
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Critical Essay by Gillian Boddy
5,430 words, approx. 18 pages
In the following essay, Boddy traces the differences between “Late Spring” and the posthumously published story “This Flower.”
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Critical Essay by Andrew Gurr
5,122 words, approx. 17 pages
In the following excerpt, Gurr comments on Katherine Mansfield's attitude toward her being, in effect, an exile in England from her native New Zealand.
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Critical Essay by Susan Lohafer
5,088 words, approx. 17 pages
In the following essay, Lohafer recommends a “storiographical” approach to “Life of Ma Parker,” contending that a close analysis of this type reveals otherwise unappreciated complexity in the story.
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Critical Essay by Gardner McFall
4,755 words, approx. 16 pages
In the following essay, McFall contends that Mansfield's “concision, mobilization of imagery and rhythm, irony, ambiguity, and submerged lyric voice” necessitate that readers afford “Bliss” the attention usually reserved for poems.
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Critical Essay by David A. Lee
4,214 words, approx. 14 pages
In the following essay, Lee explores “the role of language in the mediation of perspective in both the literal and metaphorical sense” as exemplified in Mansfield's story “Prelude.”
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Critical Essay by Horst Breuer
4,111 words, approx. 14 pages
In the following essay, Breuer offers a psychoanalytic interpretation of “The Stranger” and investigates the literary source of the story's title.
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Critical Essay by Pamela Dunbar
3,126 words, approx. 10 pages
In the following excerpt, Dunbar considers various influences on Mansfield's short fiction and discusses her contribution to the modernist short story.
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Critical Essay by Robert L. Caserio
1,731 words, approx. 6 pages
In the following essay, Caserio outlines the defining characteristics of Mansfield's short fiction and discusses her status among English modernist authors.


Works by the Author

There are 21 critical essays on literary works by Katherine Mansfield.

The Fly (short story)



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