There are 13 critical essays on Culture and Anarchy.

Critical Essays on Culture and Anarchy
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Critical Essay by William E. Buckler
16,584 words, approx. 55 pages
In the following essay, Buckler analyzes Arnold's role as a critical moralist, focusing on the high standard that the author set for himself and the society in which he lived.
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Critical Essay by Linda Ray Pratt
12,322 words, approx. 41 pages
In the following essay, Pratt traces the development of Arnold's philosophy in works written prior to Culture and Anarchy, commenting on the incorporation of these ideas into his most well-known work.
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Critical Essay by Vincent P. Pecora
10,313 words, approx. 34 pages
In the following essay, Pecora considers various critical approaches to Culture and Anarchy, paying particular attention to Arnold's notion, or lack thereof, of race.
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Critical Essay by Richard D. Altick
10,284 words, approx. 34 pages
In the following essay, Altick examines Arnold's use of wit and satire in portraying the governors of Victorian society as enemies of the people.
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Critical Essay by J. Dover Wilson
10,023 words, approx. 33 pages
In the following introduction, Wilson considers the development and background of Culture and Anarchy.
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Critical Essay by Wendell V. Harris
8,875 words, approx. 30 pages
In the following essay, Harris compares Thomas Carlyle's “Signs of the Times” with Arnold's Culture and Anarchy, concluding that Arnold's societal solutions are much more radical.
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Critical Essay by Steven Marcus
8,330 words, approx. 28 pages
In the following essay, Marcus argues that Arnold's work, while powerful in its own time, is still applicable to the societal problems of today.
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Critical Essay by Stefan Collini
7,172 words, approx. 24 pages
In the following essay, Collini discusses the purpose and style of Culture and Anarchy, while also commenting on the lasting impact the work has had on the debate about the relationship between politics and culture.
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Critical Essay by Robert Alan Donovan
6,773 words, approx. 23 pages
In the following essay, Donovan compares Arnold's philosophy with that of John Stuart Mill, discussing Arnold's societal remedy of taking authority out of the hands of the state and placing it into the “hands of those who are able to transcend class spirit and prejudice.”
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Critical Essay by Samuel Lipman
6,485 words, approx. 22 pages
In the following essay, Lipman comments on the importance of Culture and Anarchy as a seminal text in helping form a society that has abolished anarchy.
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Critical Essay by Ira B. Nadel
4,977 words, approx. 17 pages
In the following essay, Nadel discusses the usefulness of applying new critical approaches, such as sociology, historicity, and semiology, to Culture and Anarchy in order to enhance understanding of the text.
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Critical Essay by Maurice Cowling
4,568 words, approx. 15 pages
In the following essay, Cowling analyzes the intent of Culture and Anarchy and the difficulty of trying to translate the work into modern terms.
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Critical Essay by John Gross
3,886 words, approx. 13 pages
In the following essay, Gross presents an overview of the critical response to Arnold's work and concludes that Culture and Anarchy remains relevant to readers in modern times.


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