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There are 16 critical essays on Bapsi Sidhwa.

Critical Essays on Bapsi Sidhwa
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Interview by Bapsi Sidhwa and David Montenegro
7,285 words, approx. 24 pages
In the following interview, which took originally took place on March 26, 1988, and March 24, 1989, Sidhwa discusses Pakistani politics, issues facing Muslim women, contemporary Islamic literature, and the central themes of her novels.
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Critical Essay by Novy Kapadia
4,772 words, approx. 16 pages
In the following essay, Kapadia discusses the phenomenon of upward social mobility among the Parsi minority in Sidhwa's novel The Crow Eaters.
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Critical Essay by Jagdev Singh
4,356 words, approx. 15 pages
In the following essay, Singh examines Ice-Candy-Man as a novel about the Partition of India told from the unique perspective of a sensitive Parsi girl. Singh comments that the story focuses on the effect of the Partition on the Parsi community as a whole.
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Interview by Bapsi Sidhwa and Preeti Singh
3,722 words, approx. 12 pages
In the following interview, Sidhwa discusses the autobiographical elements of her fiction, her role as a postcolonial female author, her identity as a member of the Parsi community, and the use of humor in her novels.
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Critical Essay by Alamgir Hashmi
1,436 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following essay, Hashmi offers high praise for Sidhwa's novel The Crow Eaters as a representation of Parsi culture and history.
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Critical Review by Chris Goodrich
818 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Goodrich praises An American Brat, calling the work “a funny and memorable novel.”
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Critical Review by Edward Hower
768 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Hower offers high praise for The Crow Eaters, applauding Sidhwa for her endearing characters and effective use of humor, farce, and satire.
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Critical Review by Edit Villarreal
735 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Villarreal comments that An American Brat is an “affecting, amusing, and enjoyable” novel about a young woman's coming of age and the immigrant experience in America.
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Critical Review by Marianne Wiggins
706 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Wiggins criticizes Ice-Candy-Man, asserting that the novel is a failure in terms of its stereotyped characterization, problematic narrative voice, weak sense of place, and oversimplified representation of the story's political context.
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Critical Review by Patricia Craig
656 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Craig compliments the elements of black comedy in The Crow Eaters.
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Critical Review by Tariq Rahman
650 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Rahman offers a positive assessment of Ice-Candy-Man, praising the novel's sophisticated and effective narrative techniques.
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Critical Review by Adele King
542 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, King criticizes An American Brat as a problematic and flawed novel, noting that Sidhwa's narrative is “unsophisticated” and that the story oversimplifies American life.
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Critical Review by Alamgir Hashmi
372 words, approx. 1 pages
In the following review, Hashmi praises The Bride for its farcical elements and its examination of the complexity of socio-cultural differences in Pakistan.
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Critical Review by Maria Couto
356 words, approx. 1 pages
In the following excerpt, Couto comments that, while Sidhwa's storytelling talents are impressive, Ice-Candy-Man is ultimately flawed due to the author's problematic rendering of narrative voice.
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Critical Review by Frank Rudm
329 words, approx. 1 pages
In the following excerpt, Rudm offers a positive assessment of The Crow Eaters, calling the novel “a wholly charming passage to India.”
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Critical Review by Judy Cooke
265 words, approx. 1 pages
In the following excerpt, Cooke praises The Crow Eaters as an “excellent” and enjoyable novel.


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