Neil Young | Critical Essay by Stephen Holden

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Neil Young.
This section contains 492 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stephen Holden

Critical Essay by Stephen Holden

Since his days with Buffalo Springfield, the shifts in Neil Young's preoccupations have presented a barometer of a generation's attitudes toward itself, reflecting the dissolution of political idealism and, beyond that, the end of the romance of youth itself. Even in such early ballads as "Sugar Mountain" and "I Am a Child," Young gently warned against living with the illusion of perpetual youth, while his childlike vocals tantalized us with the possibility. The pain of facing adult reality at an age and in an era that encouraged prolonged adolescent fantasy comprised the underlying theme of Young's first three solo albums, a trilogy that culminated in After the Gold Rush, perhaps the quintessential turn-of-the-decade album by a folk-rock soloist.

Whereas Bob Dylan's music formed the aesthetic spearhead of generational rage and moral fervor in the mid-Sixties, Young's subsequently expressed, with equal...

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This section contains 492 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stephen Holden
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