Young Goodman Brown | Critical Essay by Robert E. Morsberger

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of Young Goodman Brown.
This section contains 2,797 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Robert E. Morsberger

SOURCE: 'The Woe That Is Madness: Goodman Brown and the Face of the Fire," in The Nathaniel Hawthorne Journal 1973, edited by C. E. Frazer Clark, Jr., Microcard Editions Books, 1973, pp. 177-82.

In the following essay, Morsberger contends that Goodman Brown's loss of faith in others reflects the beginnings of American political and social paranoia.

Hawthorne, if any one, was equipped to write the definitive novel on the Salem witchcraft delusion; but he never confronted it head on. "Alice Doane's Appeal" conjures up the victims from the graveyard, Grandfather's Chair and "Main Street" give the barest bones of a synopsis, "Sir William Phips" merely hints at it, and The House of the Seven Gables fictionalizes its heritage of guilt. But nowhere does Hawthorne give the dramatic account in depth of the trial and tragedy of Rebecca Nurse, George Burroughs...

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This section contains 2,797 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert E. Morsberger