P. G. Wodehouse | Critical Essay by Wilfrid Sheed

This literature criticism consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis & critique of P. G. Wodehouse.
This section contains 1,816 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alexander Cockburn

Critical Essay by Wilfrid Sheed

Somewhere between the Romantic Revolution and the Great Victorian Exhibition of 1851 in England, suet pudding entered the English soul, after which it became almost impossible for that country to produce a pure artist. Despite generous help from Ireland, America and even Poland, any Englishman who had been to a public school felt and looked like a perfect chump, a tourist, in the world of Flaubert and Rimbaud.

It was almost as if these schools, founded in the 1830's, had it for their main object that Shelley and Byron would never happen again….

Hence the English aesthete from the Yellow Book nineties through Bloomsbury is a sorry figure: either a thick-skinned humorless survivor (or Sitwell) or a wounded bird, limping around the wounded-bird preserve with the others. While overhead soared the inverse aesthetes or anti-artists: Kipling, W. S. Gilbert, Conan...

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This section contains 1,816 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alexander Cockburn
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