John Winthrop | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 45 pages of analysis & critique of John Winthrop.
This section contains 13,314 words
(approx. 45 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Douglas Anderson

SOURCE: "'This Great Household upon the Earth'," in A House Divided: Domesticity and Community in American Literature, Cambridge University Press, 1990, pp. 8-39.

In the following excerpt, Anderson traces Winthrop's idea of community as evidenced in his writings and compares it with those of Anne Bradstreet and Edward Taylor.

The Book of Deuteronomy, particularly its closing chapters, had an irresistible appeal for the first generation of New England Puritans because of the parallels they recognized between their own situation and that of the Children of Israel, poised upon the borders of the Promised Land. All of the Old Testament had typological significance, of course, and the New Testament was the source that the leaders of the emigrants would consult for guidance in shaping their communal institutions. But it was to Deuteronomy that John Winthrop turned when he sought a forceful conclusion for the discourse on Christian charity that he...

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This section contains 13,314 words
(approx. 45 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Douglas Anderson
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Critical Essay by Douglas Anderson from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.