A Streetcar Named Desire | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2Ā pages of analysis & critique of A Streetcar Named Desire.
This section contains 375 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Watts, Jr.

[The essay from which this excerpt is taken originally appeared in The New York Post, December 4, 1947.]

[A Streetcar Named Desire] is a feverish, squalid, tumultuous, painful, steadily arresting and oddly touching study of feminine decay along the lower Mississippiā€¦. Mr. Williams is an oncoming playwright of power, imagination and almost desperately morbid turn of mind and emotion. In his latest work to reach Broadway, the dramatist is telling the story of a doomed Southern girl who seems startlingly like what the foolish old mother of his previous drama, "The Glass Menagerie," might well have been at a similar age. Hers, to put it mildly, is not a pleasant life story. Essentially a romantic and dreamy young woman, it is her fate to represent in her frail spirit the decline and fall of a long line of decadent Southern aristocrats, and, for all her sentimental imagination, she ends as...

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This section contains 375 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Watts, Jr.
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Critical Essay by Richard Watts, Jr. from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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