A Streetcar Named Desire | Critical Essay by John Gassner

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of A Streetcar Named Desire.
This section contains 1,385 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John Gassner

Critical Essay by John Gassner

Among the new plays of the 1947–48 season A Streetcar Named Desire was not only the best but the most indicative of the flexibility of realism. Strongly rooted in the reality of character and environment, and replete with stinging naturalistic detail, this tragedy of a fallen member of the Southern landed aristocracy, nevertheless, abounds in poetic overtones. These are justified, in part, by Blanche's refinement of language. She is well bred and she has had sufficient education to have taught school for a while. Her consuming need, moreover, is to make herself and others constantly aware of her refinement. She is concealing her tawdry past of alcoholism, incontinence, and common prostitution. She is compensating for her fallen estate. Her memories being as unbearable as her present circumstances, she must transform both by building a dream-world for herself. Obviously, this world...

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This section contains 1,385 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John Gassner