Tennessee Williams | Critical Essay by Kenneth Tynan

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Tennessee Williams.
This section contains 310 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kenneth Tynan

[The article from which this excerpt was taken was originally published as "American Blues: The Plays of Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams," in Encounter, May, 1954.]

If Willy Loman [of Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman] is the desperate average man, Blanche DuBois is the desperate exceptional woman. Willy's collapse began when his son walked into a hotel apartment and found him with a whore; Blanche's when she entered "a room that I thought was empty," and found her young husband embracing an older man. In each instance the play builds up to a climax involving guilt and concomitant disgust. Blanche, nervously boastful, lives in the leisured past; her defence against actuality is a sort of aristocratic Bovarysme, at which her brutish brother-in-law Stanley repeatedly sneers. Characteristically, Williams keeps his detachment, and does not take sides: he never denies that Stanley's wife, in spite of her...

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This section contains 310 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kenneth Tynan
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Critical Essay by Kenneth Tynan from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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