Willa Cather | Critical Essay by Joan Wylie Hall

This literature criticism consists of approximately 16 pages of analysis & critique of Willa Cather.
This section contains 4,530 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Joan Wylie Hall

SOURCE: Hall, Joan Wylie. “Treacherous Texts: The Perils of Allusion in Cather's Early Stories.” Colby Library Quarterly 24, no. 3 (1988): 142–50.

In the following essay, Hall underscores the difficulties for Cather in inheriting and drawing upon a predominantly male literary canon and the ways in which she addressed this problem through fiction.

Willa Cather's recent biographer, Sharon O'Brien, suggests that the “intrusive references to male writers” in “The Treasure of Far Island” display a female author's urge to place herself in a tradition from which she feels excluded.1 Some of the same literary debts are apparent in “The Professor's Commencement,” another early Cather story that also appeared in New England Magazine in 1902.2 While she does not exaggerate the dominance of such allusions, O'Brien does overlook their suitability to the main...

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This section contains 4,530 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Joan Wylie Hall
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Joan Wylie Hall from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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