Richard Wilbur | Critical Essay by Samuel Hazo

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of Richard Wilbur.
This section contains 5,827 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: "One Definite Mozart," in Renascence, Vol. XLV, No. 1-2, Fall 1992–Winter 1993, pp. 81-96.

Hazo is an award-winning American poet and critic. In the following essay, he surveys Wilbur's works and praises him as one of the greatest American poets.

Ever since I first began reading Richard Wilbur's poems in the late 1940's, I think I've read only one negative review of his work. It was not Randall Jarrell's somewhat patronizing critique of Wilbur's second book, Ceremony. It was a review of The Mind-Reader by Calvin Bedient in The New Republic (June 5, 1976). Bedient contended that Wilbur was too safe a poet—that he rarely took chances. The reviewer was not referring to subject matter; he was taking Wilbur to task for deliberately choosing to remain within the limits of traditional metrics and prosody and yielding to "moral complacency."

I mention this now because...

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This section contains 5,827 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Samuel Hazo
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Critical Essay by Samuel Hazo from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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