Waverley (novel) | Critical Essay by David Oberhelman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 24 pages of analysis & critique of Waverley (novel).
This section contains 7,034 words
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SOURCE: Oberhelman, David. “Waverley, Genealogy, History: Scott's Romance of Fathers and Sons.” Nineteenth-Century Contexts 15, no. 1 (1991): 29-47.

In the following essay, Oberhelman reorients the debate concerning Scott's historicism in Waverley from a dialectic of history and romance to a thematic opposition of genealogy and teleological history.

As the first English “historical novel,” Walter Scott's Waverley introduces a set of complicated genre distinctions that affect his entire corpus. “History” and “romance,” the two terms Scott problematizes in his presentation throughout the Waverley Chronicles, become the focal points in a critical polemic revolving around his general claim to “historicism”—to a coherent theory of history manifested in his novels.1 Indeed, the abrupt shift from one of those generic terms to the other in the third volume of...

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This section contains 7,034 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by David Oberhelman
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by David Oberhelman from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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