Evelyn Waugh | Critical Essay by Stephen Jay Greenblatt

This literature criticism consists of approximately 12 pages of analysis & critique of Evelyn Waugh.
This section contains 3,315 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stephen Jay Greenblatt

Critical Essay by Stephen Jay Greenblatt

Evelyn Waugh, like Charles Ryder [the narrator of Brideshead Revisited], is an architectural painter who sees, with anger, horror, and a kind of fascination, the destruction of old homes, the decay of institutions, the death of meaningful values. But Waugh refuses to create a merely sentimental picture of the achievements of the past at the moment of extinction; he insists, rather, upon recording in scrupulous detail the actual process of demolition. In Waugh's satiric vision, seeming trivial events—the breaking up of a manor house, the redecoration of an old room with chromium plating, a drunken brawl in an Oxford courtyard—are symbols of a massive, irreversible, and terrifying victory of barbarism and the powers of darkness over civilization and light. Waugh's early novels, especially Decline and Fall (1928), Vile Bodies (1930), Black Mischief (1932), and A Handful of...

(read more)

This section contains 3,315 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stephen Jay Greenblatt
Follow Us on Facebook