David Foster Wallace | Interview by Larry McCaffery

This literature criticism consists of approximately 42 pages of analysis & critique of David Foster Wallace.
This section contains 12,406 words
(approx. 42 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Interview by Larry McCaffery

SOURCE: "An Interview with David Foster Wallace," in Review of Contemporary Fiction, Vol, 13, No. 2, Summer, 1993, pp. 127-50.

In the following interview, McCaffery questions Wallace on matters of style, technique, and substance in his writing, as well as his relationship to the popular culture that figures so prominently in his work.

[Larry McCaffery:] Your essay following this interview is going to be seen by some people as being basically an apology for television. What's your response to the familiar criticism that television fosters relationships with illusions or simulations of real people (Reagan being a kind of quintessential example)?

[David Foster Wallace:] It's a try at a comprehensive diagnosis, not an apology. U.S. viewers' relationship with TV is essentially puerile and dependent, as are all relationships based on seduction. This is hardly news. But what's seldom acknowledged is how complex and ingenious TV's seductions are. It's seldom...

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This section contains 12,406 words
(approx. 42 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Interview by Larry McCaffery
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Literature Criticism Series
Interview by Larry McCaffery from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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