Walden | Critical Review by The National Era

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Walden.
This section contains 377 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by The National Era

Critical Review by The National Era

SOURCE: A review of Walden, in The National Era, Vol. 8, No. 404, September 28, 1854, p. 155.

In this anonymous review, the author is concerned about the consequences for civilization if every man were to follow Thoreau's example and live a simple solitary life.

In its narrative, this book [Walden] is unique, in its philosophy quite Emersonian. It is marked by genius of a certain order, but just as strongly, by pride of intellect. It contains many acute observations on the follies of mankind, but enough of such follies to show that its author has his full share of the infirmities of human nature, without being conscious of it. By precept and example he clearly shows how very little is absolutely necessary to the subsistence of a man, what a Robinson Crusoe life he may lead in Massachusetts, how little labor he...

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This section contains 377 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by The National Era