The Aeneid | Critical Essay by Douglas J. Stewart

This literature criticism consists of approximately 24 pages of analysis & critique of The Aeneid.
This section contains 7,037 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Douglas J. Stewart

SOURCE: "Morality, Mortality, and the Public Life: Aeneas the Politician," in The Antioch Review, Vol. 32, No. 4, Fall/Winter, 1973, pp. 649–64.

In the following essay, Stewart emphasizes the political didacticism of the Aeneid, claiming the "essential subject" of the poem "is the 'education ' of a political leader."

In his 1961 lectures from the Oxford Chair of Poetry Robert Graves labeled Virgil the "anti-poet"—in Graves-peak, roughly, the Anti-Christ—and denounced him for "pliability … subservience … narrowness; his denial of the stubborn imaginative freedom that the true poets who preceded him had valued; his lack of originality, courage, humour, or even animal spirits…. " Graves' performance, long awaited as the most spectacular clash of humors in a generation, was really rather tame, if not conventional. Most students of Virgil had heard that litany before, based as it...

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This section contains 7,037 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Douglas J. Stewart
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