John Updike | Critical Essay by Eliot Fremont-smith

This literature criticism consists of approximately 19 pages of analysis & critique of John Updike.
This section contains 1,078 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Donald J. Greiner

Critical Essay by Eliot Fremont-smith

Rabbit, Run, that heart-stopping epiphany of 21 years ago, should never have had a sequel, and now it's got two. John Updike's privilege, I suppose; one must bend with the facts, if not forgive. Rabbit Redux still seems a rude trespass on what had become, after all, the property of my imagination; yet without it there could be no [Rabbit Is Rich] …, no renewal of affection, no return of grace. The alter ego stuff aside, there's a juicy bravado to Updike's long loyalty to Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom that I can't help liking. The desperate, fleeing angel of Rabbit, Run is now, surprisingly, "family," and we're all growing older together. There's caring in this, and even some dignity—Rabbit still ruts as a rabbit will (his literally saving grace), but now he's most often called Harry, and jogs rather than runs. There's abrasiveness, too: Updike's...

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This section contains 1,078 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Donald J. Greiner