John Updike | Critical Essay by Joyce Carol Oates

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of John Updike.
This section contains 1,198 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Joyce Carol Oates

What [Updike] has to say [in The Coup] is mordant, outrageous, and bitterly self-mocking, a lengthy monologue that really is a coup of sorts, constituting Updike's most experimental novel to date. Kush is Ellelloû's fiction just as The Coup is Updike's fastidiously circumscribed fiction, a country set in an "Africa" of words. And what a virtuoso display Updike gives us! Not even [Nabokov's] Pale Fire, another inspired work by another displaced "ruler," is more darkly comic, more abrasively surreal, than Updike's Ellelloû's testimony….

Where Márquez's Faulknerian The Autumn of the Patriarch presented a bizarre dictator seen from without, filtered through the voices of a number of close observers, Updike's Nabokovian The Coup gives us the dictator in his own voice, as he sardonically and brokenly recounts the comic-opera...

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This section contains 1,198 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Joyce Carol Oates