Anne Tyler | Critical Essay by Mary F. Robertson

This literature criticism consists of approximately 35 pages of analysis & critique of Anne Tyler.
This section contains 10,273 words
(approx. 35 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Mary F. Robertson

SOURCE: "Medusa Points and Contact Points," in Contemporary American Women Writers: Narrative Strategies, The University Press of Kentucky, 1985, pp. 119-42.

In the following essay, Robertson analyzes how Tyler changes traditional ideas about family and its interaction with outsiders in her novels.

John Updike, a fan of Anne Tyler's work, remarked in a review that "Tyler, whose humane and populous novels have attracted (if my antennae are tuned right) less approval in the literary ether than the sparer offerings of Ann Beattie and Joan Didion, is sometimes charged with the basic literary sin of implausibility." Indeed, Tyler's novels do not seem a promising hunting ground for critics, who seek advances in the experimental surface of fiction. Her most palpable narrative virtues are by and large traditional ones: memorable characters, seductive plots, imaginative and hawk-eyed descriptions. Tyler is adept with the simile, acute as a psychologist...

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This section contains 10,273 words
(approx. 35 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Mary F. Robertson
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Critical Essay by Mary F. Robertson from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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