Twelfth Night | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 27 pages of analysis & critique of Twelfth Night.
This section contains 6,916 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Cynthia Lewis

SOURCE: Lewis, Cynthia. “Viola, Antonio, and Epiphany in Twelfth Night.Essays in Literature 13, no. 2 (fall 1986): 187-99.

In the following essay, Lewis contends that Antonio, rather than Viola, is the moral center of Twelfth Night, but acknowledges that the play is principally concerned with Viola's moral development.

Disguise in Twelfth Night is sheer, a thin veil like the “cypress” that “hides” Olivia's “heart” in III.i.1 Viola, although dressed in sturdier male clothing, almost reveals herself inadvertently at several points, as during the duel with Sir Andrew and the interviews with Olivia. Other of Shakespeare's strong, disguised women do not hover quite so closely on the brink of losing control: Portia commands her identity as judge, and Rosalind manipulates her boyish exterior to teach her future husband about love, only once verging on disclosing her true identity before she is ready to.2 Viola's contrasting lack of sure control over...

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This section contains 6,916 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Cynthia Lewis
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Critical Essay by Cynthia Lewis from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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