Twelfth Night | Critical Essay by Harry Levin

This literature criticism consists of approximately 12 pages of analysis & critique of Twelfth Night.
This section contains 3,504 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Harry Levin

Critical Essay by Harry Levin

SOURCE: “The Underplot of Twelfth Night,” in Twelfth Night: Critical Essays, edited by Stanley Wells, Garland Publishing, Inc., 1986, pp. 161-69.

In the essay below, originally published in 1976, Levin compares and contrasts the main plot and subplot of Twelfth Night, describing Malvolio as the star of the underplot.

The kind of comedy that was practiced by Shakespeare has repeatedly challenged definition. Though his last comedies have been retrospectively classified as romances, most of their components are equally characteristic of his earlier ones: love, adventure, coincidence, recognition, and occasional pathos. The problem is not simplified by the circumstance that his greatest comic character, Falstaff, was far more impressive in two histories than he is in The Merry Wives of Windsor. Traditional definitions of the comic somehow fail to hit the Shakespearean mark, perhaps because they tend to emphasize...

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This section contains 3,504 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Harry Levin