Twelfth Night | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Karen Greif

This literature criticism consists of approximately 42 pages of analysis & critique of Twelfth Night.
This section contains 12,499 words
(approx. 42 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Karen Greif

SOURCE: "A Star is Born: Feste on the Modern Stage," in Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 39, No. 1, Spring, 1988, pp. 61-78.

In the essay below, Greif traces the evolution of Feste in twentieth-century productions ofTwelfth Night. She contends that Feste has become an alienated figure, who is profoundly aware of human frailty and the transience of human existence.

All the characters in Twelfth Night are masqueraders—all imposters, self-deceivers, and counterfeiters, and all beguiled, to some degree, by the game of charades whirling around them. Only Feste the jester keeps his mask from slipping.1 He alone remains inscrutable, a quality that has made his character particularly fascinating to our century. We are intrigued by ambiguities, obsessed with ironies, and bewitched by paradoxes. So it is natural that the modern theatre has drawn attention to Feste, and in him we have discovered our...

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This section contains 12,499 words
(approx. 42 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Karen Greif