Twelfth Night | Critical Review by Ann Pasternak Slater

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of Twelfth Night.
This section contains 1,071 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Ann Pasternak Slater

Critical Review by Ann Pasternak Slater

SOURCE: "A Wrangle for a Ring," in The Times Literary Supplement, No. 4179, May 6, 1983, p. 459.

John Caird's production of Twelfth Night opens in an atmosphere of brooding impasse. Torpid thunder rumbles intermittently, achieving downpour only at the play's end—cued by Feste's "The rain it raineth every day". A sapless tree of wrinkled polystyrene overhangs the stage. Barren rascals and dry fools roister and languish beneath it, or climb its leafless branches. It dominates both the action and the programme notes. Evidently it symbolizes the fruitless love-quests in the play, where Aguecheek loves Olivia who loves Viola/Cesario who loves Orsino who loves Olivia—a neat little one-way system of Cupid's arrows, designed to keep characters and audience going round in circles. Only time can release us from the irrational directives of the heart: "What else may...

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This section contains 1,071 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Ann Pasternak Slater