Twelfth Night | Critical Review by T. C. Worsley

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Twelfth Night.
This section contains 1,063 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Peter Jackson

Critical Review by T. C. Worsley

SOURCE: A review of Twelfth Night in The New Stateman & Nation, Vol. XL, No. 1029, November 25, 1950, pp. 498, 500.

The best criticism I have heard of Mr. Hugh Hunt's production of Twelfth Night—with which the Old Vic make a welcome return to their old home in the Waterloo Road—was contained in a remark by a friend who listened to a description of it and then said: "I see, in other words, it managed to be both arty and hearty." It is just that. Its best bits are the hearty bits, centred round a fine scarlet-faced, broad-bottomed, big-bellied, rasping Roger Livesey as Sir Toby. Its worst bits are the arty framework which the producer has thought fit to provide. There are the simpering attendants on Olivia. There is a chorus of boys in beards and girls in...

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This section contains 1,063 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Peter Jackson