Troilus and Cressida | Critical Essay by Laurie E. Maguire

This literature criticism consists of approximately 43 pages of analysis & critique of Troilus and Cressida.
This section contains 12,792 words
(approx. 43 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Laurie E. Maguire

SOURCE: Maguire, Laurie E. “Performing Anger: The Anatomy of Abuse(s) in Troilus and Cressida.Renaissance Drama n.s. 31 (2002): 153-83.

In the following essay, Maguire explains Cressida's submission to Diomedes, contending that she is a victim of Diomedes' abuse and manipulation and that “Cressida consequently behaves as do most abused women: she submits.”

Fortune is a woman, and it is necessary to beat her and maul her when you want to keep her under control.

—Machiavelli, The Prince1

Shakespeare's Cressida has been heavily criticized for her transfer of allegiance from Troilus to Diomedes. Just twenty-four hours after consummating a relationship with Troilus, the man she has loved for “many weary months,” she accepts the advances of her Greek guard, Diomedes, and cements the relationship with...

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This section contains 12,792 words
(approx. 43 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Laurie E. Maguire