Troilus and Cressida | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 32 pages of analysis & critique of Troilus and Cressida.
This section contains 8,517 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michael G. Bielmeier

SOURCE: Bielmeier, Michael G. “Ethics and Anxiety in Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida.Christianity & Literature 50, no. 2 (winter 2001): 225-45.

In the following essay, Bielmeier uses the philosophical works of Kierkegaard to demonstrate that Cressida and the bastard Thersites are the most ethical characters in the war-torn world of Troilus and Cressida.

In his seminal study titled Shakespeare, Our Contemporary, Ian Kott evaluates Troilus and Cressida from the prevailing European existential perspective of the mid-twentieth century. He sees the play as “a dispute about the existence of a moral order in a cruel and irrational world.” He further states that the characters are aware of the “absurd” nature of the world in which they live and that they must “give it a purpose in order to preserve the sense of the world's existence and a scale of values” (77).1 A Kierkegaardian existentialist reading, however, differs rather dramatically from Kott's.2 From a Kierkegaardian...

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This section contains 8,517 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michael G. Bielmeier
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Critical Essay by Michael G. Bielmeier from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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